Trending Elected Faces of Afghan House of Representatives (16): The Path of 2 Lawmakers from Balkh Province       |       Elected Faces of Afghan House of Representatives (15): The Path of 5 Lawmakers from Badghis, Herat, Laghman and Paktika       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (14): Journey of 4 Lawmakers from Herat, Ghor and Badghis Province       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (13): The Journey of 4 Representatives from Farah, Kapisa, Paktika and Parwan Provinces       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (12): The Path of 4 Representatives from Daykundi, Nuristan and Sar-e Pol Provinces       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (11): Journey of 4 Representatives from Khost and Bamyan Provinces       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (10): The Journey of 4 Representatives from Ghor, Herat, Balkh and Paktika Provinces       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (9): Journey of 3 Representatives in the New Round of Parliament       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives (8): The Journey of 4 Representatives from Herat, Ghor, Balkh and Daykundi Provinces       |       Elected Lawmakers of Afghan House of Representatives [7]: The Journey of Three Representatives from Nimroz, Bamyan and Kunar Provinces
Now is Not the Time to Rush Exit Strategy in Afghanistan, Don’t Sacrifice Progress of Past Years, Says Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary General

Now is Not the Time to Rush Exit Strategy in Afghanistan, Don’t Sacrifice Progress of Past Years, Says Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary General

Reporterly

Reporterly Reporterly

30 Jan 2019

In a statement in reaction to Afghanistan peace talks, Jan Egeland, the Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council expressed that “As humanitarian workers in Afghanistan we welcome any negotiated solution that can end decades of brutal conflict in Afghanistan. There is no military solution to this bitter conflict, but although the international community is fatigued, now is not the time to rush an exit strategy in which the Afghan people may be worse off than they were before. An end to armed conflict among men must not come at the expense of every-day Afghan women, men and children”.

The statement added that foreign forces and representations have been withdrawing from Afghanistan under an “optimistic narrative spun by NATO” when it was leaving Afghanistan – a narrative of progress in a more safe and secure country. The statement continued “This rhetoric is misplaced as what we see on the ground is continued high levels of violence, thousands of people wounded and killed every year, as well as hundreds of thousands forced from their homes and over 6 million people left in need”.

“Current negotiations should seek an end to the war, but also ensure that we can stay and continue to deliver to the millions of women, children and men who are still in urgent need of protection, aid and education. Negotiations must include specific agreements whereby aid actors are given the space, safety and support we need to reach people in need. No compromises should be made jeopardizing civilians’ access to protection and aid. Currently, dialogue for humanitarian access and protection have been pushed off the table, in favour of peace talks”, Egeland expressed.

Finally it was conceded that “The current peace negotiations must successfully end the bloodshed without sacrificing the hard won progress that has been achieved over the last decades.”